You Are Not Alone

With every passing day…I’m thoroughly convinced of one thing. I’m exactly where I should be…especially as it relates to my professional path. The trajectory of my career has changed significantly over the past several years.

In 2000, I departed undergraduate school with a BA degree and high hopes of conquering the television industry. I was on the path too…starting behind the scenes as an associate producer. And continuously moved up the ranks from associate producer to reporter to main news anchor.

By the end of the decade, I’d changed careers…opting for an industry that I accidentally stumbled on in graduate school. Organizational development. This field smiled on me. Changed my life. And equipped me with the tools to diagnose and treat common issues that occurred in the television industry. And every other industry where employees work and hit a brick wall. My mission is to help organizations tear brick walls down and stitch up employees. And prescribe treatments that help employees flourish in a healthy workplace.

What’s the point of this story? If you don’t walk away with any helpful tip in this post…know this. You are not alone. If we work long enough…in life…or at one organization we all endure chaos in the workplace. Organizations aren’t perfect. And every working individual gets frustrated with work processes and systems. Feel stressed, overworked, underpaid, and fatigued. When career plans don’t pan out the way we expect…self doubt creeps into our heads. We question ourselves. But, our greatest adversity can bring about the greatest life changes.

The following is a short exercise to get you on track…perhaps on a new track.

  1. Define the problem with your current situation.
  2. Analyze and determine how you can change that situation.
  3. Write down four things you can do to inspire yourself on the job. Learn a new technique maybe. Master a new concept.
  4. Identify tasks that bring you joy in the workplace.
  5. Redefine your work and career goals.
  6. Prioritize your next steps. Create a timeline to accomplish goals.

Have questions about this post? Need to chat offline? Shoot me an email at fromtv2odblogger@gmail.com.

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Categories: Growth & Development

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3 replies

  1. I am in a peculiar situation right now. I encourage my juniors to take charge of their assignments and in the process ask them to go with papers etc. to Head of department. I presume that they feel motivated this way, by me not trying to grab credit for their work, rather giving them exposure in front of top boss. I was okay with this situation till now, but recently three facts came to notice
    -While assessing my performance this year, the new top boss has brought it one level down.
    -I heard rumours being spread about me that I delegate all my work to juniors and sit idle myself. In fact it seems one of my reportees said so to my immediate boss.
    -My immediate boss does not like my juniors going to him with files, and not me. (I have now started doing so to please him)
    But I am confused as I still want to continue encouraging my juniors to go to big boss directly. However above 2-3 points complicate the situation.?

    • This is a common workplace scenario. Rule number one in leadership. Leaders inspire people into action. Its important for leaders to set clear goals, thoroughly explain how goals should be reached, provide coaching and feedback. Its an ongoing cycle that includes delegation, communication, and performance measurements.
      Work on your relationship with your juniors. Build trust and alliances. Relationships are built communicating and addressing concerns as a unit. Try to connect with juniors around share values. Ask your juniors what they want to learn in the organization? What they want to learn from you as their leader? And work on those goals. Focus on communication, exchange and potential opportunities to collaborate. Thank you so much for posting this comment. You have certainly raised a very valid concern for many leaders dealing with similar issues.

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